First Impressions of intern Mirek Kolaja

I remember that during my previous internship, I was pretty nervous about coming to the office for the first time – adapting to an unexplored environment, getting to know my new colleagues, aligning my upcoming work approach to the one that the internship company has. Something about it sounded terrifying to me. Not this time though.

It might have been due to my focus on picking up my bike before going to the office. However, after I survived biking in the streets and getting lost multiple times, I entered a different world.

It felt creative, warm, friendly, and the fact that I came to the office right before lunch break transmitted into a wide spectrum of smells across the whole floor.

Time to work

After the lunch break, we started with my onboarding process. First of all, we set up my company email, company signature and after that, I got a form that every new member needs to fill in. Furthermore, we had to shoot a video of me responding to the questions from that form to use as content for Ngrane’s social media as my introduction to the community (check it out if you haven’t already).

After I got all the passwords, links, and software that I am about to work on within the upcoming months, I was ready-set-go. To align with the company’s business ideas, I started with an online course on Hubspot academy that Ngrane uses to train their staff. I was assigned to a course that focused on inbound marketing since that is in general the main philosophy of Ngrane – providing the right content in the right context. By the end of this course, I felt enriched by the newly gained knowledge that showed me marketing in a bit different (less pushy) light.

The upcoming days were only focused on me getting familiar with the environment, which was certainly needed. I must say that I totally fell in love with the office space at ZOKU, which we share with other companies and freelancers. It is full of light, a creative atmosphere, constant meetings, and delicious food (if you haven’t tried jackfruit nuggets yet, you should add it to your list).

Moreover, I was participating in daily stand-ups that start every day at 9 am where everyone shares what they are about to work on during that day. I was also getting familiar with the brand guidelines in case I will have a presentation, host a workshop or prepare some agency related document sometime in the future. There were also other softwares for managing projects and also making the work flow easier and more efficient such as Asana or Harvest, but more about them in upcoming blogs. At the end of the first week, I felt tired of course but also thrilled and excited for the upcoming weeks that will surely send some projects my way.

Lessons learned

The learning outcome for the first week was definitely related to the online course that I had to finish in order to get an understanding of how Ngrane communicates.

Besides, I learned about a different approach to marketing that aims for creating valuable content along the buyer’s journey in order to form a relationship with the audience.

On top of that, Ngrane welcomed me with open arms as a new member of the community which I believe will reflect in our collaboration. I bet that’s everything an intern can wish for.

Final Thoughts

First impressions can make wonders and I am glad my first impression with Ngrane was better than I expected. I matched with my colleagues and the environment pretty well. I got an immediate feeling that my upcoming weeks and months at Ngrane will be worth it.

I am so looking forward to seeing my growth as an aspiring UX designer & Project Manager while being surrounded by like-minded professionals who know their craft and are using it to do good.


Engaging your community

Ngrane is all about community. About working from the heart. About connecting.

It’s always great when colleagues get along and get to know each other. This creates a better atmosphere, a better work environment and just better team work. But how do we get to know each other better, how do we interact, how do we connect in Covid Times?

Host a Company Wide Expo

At Ngrane, we have a couple of things we do to stay involved. We have an Expo every Friday. What exactly is an Expo, you might ask. Well, an Expo is short for an Exposition (duh), and it could be about everything. The fun part about it: everyone has to do at least one Expo per about two or three months. You choose your topic, you choose whether it’s interactive, more like a TedTalk, whether it’s fun and games or a serious debate about human rights. Wanna talk about space travel and NASA and SpaceX? Sure! Wanna talk about photography and developing film? Of course you should! Wanna give a short HTML workshop? Go ahead! Wanna share your cultural heritage? Please do! Anything is possible.

Play Games

Playing games is one of the most connecting (and sometimes disconnecting if you’re a sore loser) activities a company could think of. We used the online grounds of Gather.town a couple of times to connect after work. You can build your own online office here, and play some of their games. Good at drawing? You will like the ‘guess my drawing’ game. Good at associative thinking? Play an online version of Codenames! They have lots and lots of games you can play and it’s just a fun environment to be in.

Book Club

To dive a little deeper into our human psychologies, Stephen, our CEO, came up with a book club. Together we read Dit ben ik!, written by Lieuwe Koopmans, about Transactional Analysis. Say what? This book is about finding your true self, how to communicate about yourself and with others and how to broaden your perspective.

Transactional Analysis is a type of psychoanalytic theory and method of therapy, where your social transactions you’ve had throughout your life are analyzed. This gives valuable insights in how you communicate, and where some of your behaviours come from.

It’s not really a light read. It’s also about traumatic experiences, and how we’ve overcome them or are still overcoming them. But it does bring you as a team closer together, and helps you understand where someone might be coming from.

Of course, if you want to pick a lighter read before you start this one, do that! But discussing something you’ve all read, brings out more perspectives and will ultimately bring your team closer together.


Ngrane’s Work From Home Hacks

Even Zoom CEO Eric Yuan has Zoom fatigue.
Here are zome (see what I did there) tricks and tips.

Zooming is the new calling. The app has become an inherent part of our work from home lives.

Although it is the greatest invention of | indispensable in COVID-times, we all get tired of staring at our own faces, seeing our colleagues only in 2D and constantly staring at our blue-light blasting screens. There’s even a word for this phenomenon: Zoom fatigue.

Two weeks ago Zoom CEO Eric Yuan announced that even he has Zoom fatigue every now and then. He posted a video with some essential tips on how to use Zoom. Here’s his list:

  • Take scheduled breaks away from the computer.
  • Book meetings for 25 minutes or 55 minutes (or even try going down to 20 or 45 minutes), or end meetings early to give everyone a buffer to recover mentally between meetings.
  • Use chat or email in lieu of a meeting.
  • Try turning off self-view so you can see your colleagues’ faces, and so they can see yours, without having to see yourself.
  • Implement a “no internal meetings day” to give yourself and your employees a break. We’ve been doing this since late last year at Zoom and our employees love it.
  • Encourage employees to set boundaries around their personal time. While exceptions must be made for a global workforce, leaders should discourage night and weekend meetings.

Great tips, thanks Eric! But we have a couple to add to the list.

Welcome to NGRANE WFH Tips&Tricks. I think we all know the Zoom basics by now: mute/unmute with alt/space, gallery view/speaker view/thumbnail view, screen sharing and the lot [ no? Check this list here. ]

Our tips apply to working from home rather than the technology. Working from home can be fantastic: you can work in your most comfortable pants, shower at any time, enjoy your own delicious coffee and tea, enjoy the company of your pets & partner and blast your own music loudly at any time. 

However, working from home has its dark side. We intend to work longer, feel more guilty about taking breaks and usually spend a lot more time behind our screens. There are days we even forget to leave the house. Let’s change that. 

Don’t schedule back to back meetings.

Make sure you have time to take a break from your computer screen and grab some fresh coffee. As Eric said, make meetings as short as possible, 20 to 55 minutes max. If you do that, in combination with some space in between meetings, you have time to take care of yourself, but you will also have time to process the meetings.

Set alarms for breaks.

11 coffee break, 13 lunch, 15 another coffee / walk break. You would do the same at the office, so why not at home? Remind yourself to take those breaks to rest your eyes.

Make sure you don’t eat behind your computer.

You. need. breaks. Make sure lunch is one of those breaks! Of course, there are those days where time is scarce, but don’t make a habit out of it.

  • Also, about eating: don’t eat during Zoom calls. It may offend colleagues, you might forget to mute yourself and chew in everyone’s ears. Just don’t do it.
  • We all know the story of the lawyer who accidentally turned himself into a cat on Zoom (if not, here ya go: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGOofzZOyl8), but from time to time it’s refreshing to change your background or appearance on Zoom. It works when you turn your surroundings into a relaxing beach, an underwater world or the decor of The Lord of the Rings. You just believe you’re there for a split second and can at least enjoy your self-view. 

We noticed that some co-workers had notifications on during a Zoom call. This is of course fine, if you’re muted. However, if you’re an active participant, it might be audible for the rest of your colleagues and could get quite annoying. Make sure to turn off notifications. Here’s how:

Apple “Do not disturb”

  • On an Apple computer, click the settings icon and click “don’t disturb”.
  • You can select a period of time that the notifications are numbed.
  • Do you really want to hack this for a longer period of time? Select “preferences”.

Slack “Do not disturb”

Using Slack at work? It also has a neat don’t disturb function.

  • Select your profile at the top right corner.
  • Click ‘pause notifications’. You can choose a period of time.
  • Again, do you really want to hack? Go to settings > preferences > notifications to shut them up for good.

Windows Sleep mode

Is muting apps not enough for you? Mute your entire system!

  • Windows has a Sleep Mode, called Focus Assist.
  • Right-click on the notification icon the the taskbar.
  • Select Focus Assist and set it to ‘alarms only’.

Apple also allows you to turn the “Do not disturb” mode on indefinitely.

Last but not least, we advise you to take walks. The walk from your workstation to the coffee machine or water boiler is hardly enough for your daily workout. I know, I know, it’s not easy to drag your tired head out into the rain (we unfortunately still live in the Netherlands), but I promise: you will feel better.


How to follow your intuition as a freelancer

You probably hear it often: always trust your intuition. But what is intuition exactly, and how do you know to trust it?

Even though Stress Awareness Month is over, it doesn’t mean we should all forget about stress now. Let’s always be aware of stress. This blog might help you to stress less by following your intuition.

That’s right, intuition is something that we’re all supposed to feel naturally. Yet our head often takes over, making us doubt our intuition and making sure to make the ‘right decision’. But how can this decision be right, if you know deep down, in your gut, that something’s off?

Can we train ourselves to trust our intuition? How do we distinguish intuition from instinct?

Jos Pauwels, a Dutch writer, recently wrote a book about intuition. He states that you can train your intuition:

“Instinct is actually the basis. You can only speak of intuition when the intellect, instinct and heart start to work together. The first gut feeling is often a bit softer than the first instinct, you should see that more as a reflex. For example with fear.”

The connection between your gut feeling and the intellect is the key to strong intuition. Always listen to your gut feeling and then start to bring your brain in.

Always trust your gut. But how?

Jos makes a distinction between ‘dumb’ and ‘smart’ intuition. Dumb intuition is basically following your gut feeling without thinking. An example he uses is “love makes blind”; where we usually follow emotion and are incapable of thinking about it. To really follow intuition, you need to be conscious about it. You need a bit of inner peace: we need to train to let go of the unnecessary stimuli and focus on what’s truly important.

Easier said than done. How to put this into practice in your life as a freelancer? How would you decide when you need more time off, or how do you know if a client is a right fit for you?

Listen to that inner voice, rationalize it and take action.

Especially as a freelancer, you’ll find yourself in situations where you need to make lasting decisions. The only one you can build on, is you. Here are 5 tips on how to listen to your intuition.

  1. Trust your brain. If you feel something is inherently wrong, it might very well be the case. Try to listen to that feeling. Intuition is not random, but you might not see the pattern in the first place. Yet, your subconscious has taken in all the details, has been processing all your life and has sorted all the information you’ve ever had access to. Hence, your brain is able to distinguish a situation that’s off. Trust your brain.
  2. Try to strengthen your sense of intuition through journaling. I know, journaling takes time, it’s effort. But it can help you by writing down what you saw. When journaling you often see things you didn’t realize before.
  3. The next tip: take distance from your situation. Try to put distance between you and the problem. Journaling helps with this too, but if you’re really not into journaling, try to take a step back and view the situation with different eyes. What would you advise a friend in the same situation?
  4. Be open and honest with yourself. Easier said than done, but it will help tremendously. Don’t forget, we are our own biggest enemies. We can easily put our feelings aside, we can easily not listen to our gut. Try to ask yourself why you would not listen to your intuition, what are your main reasons to ignore your instincts. Try to meditate, to de-stress and to take a deep breath every now and then.
    Last but not least, have a little faith in yourself. You’re the only one who can make or break you, but have faith that you will find your way! If you do, it’s also easier to trust your intuition.

Of course, in most cases you will never know whether your intuition was right. Yet, if in the end you’re still happy, don’t feel stressed but very blessed: you did the right thing.


My onboarding in times of Corona

Even in times of Corona, aka during the quarantine/lockdown, people start with new jobs every day. But how exactly does that work, without an office to go to, without seeing colleagues face-to-face?

Here’s my experience of onboarding, and some essential tips to survive this period.

My first day at NGRANE in the COVID-19 lockdown

Exciting. I started my new job as content creative at NGRANE last month.
The entire interview process was through ZOOM, contract negotiations took place over the phone and the final “you’ve got the job”- conversation happened through ZOOM.

Before even having ‘met’ anyone from the company, I accepted the job.

For my first day, my new colleagues arranged a real life meeting at ZOKU with my two new bosses and their PA. After months of not going to an office, it was strange to get back into that rhythm of getting ready in the morning, having to bike to a place and meeting new people again.

I was welcomed wonderfully with a welcome basket and a hot cup of coffee. David and Stephen (the two NGRANE endbosses) explained a lot about the company, told me what I needed to know and gave a sneak peek into their passions and aspirations. We had cool talks about religion, sexuality, diversity and the future of the internet. It was really nice to see them in real life. However, we still live in COVID-19 times, so after lunch we all went home again to continue our day working remotely.

Although it was a bit silent after suddenly seeing so many people in one room (only three, but hey, it’s Corona, things are wildly out of perspective). Thankfully, I had an afternoon session with Daniëlle, the copywriter. She told me all about the projects, the clients and her ideas for future copy projects.

After this meeting, I found myself staring at an empty screen, not particularly sure what to do. How on earth would I become a master at my new job, without having a tactile experience?

How to excel in COVID times (6 tips how to master remote working)

The good thing about NGRANE, and this is also my first tip: they host daily standups. Everyone shares what they’re planning on doing that day. This is not only valuable for more efficient working, but it’s also a great way to welcome new people and to get involved with the team. So if your company isn’t doing this, propose it!

In this fast-paced world, we sometimes forget to be human. We forget the importance of human connection.

My second tip would be to plan carefully. Nothing is more annoying than sitting in front of your computer, not really knowing where to start. Perhaps a project manager can help you with that, or you can use planning tools such as Asana or Forecast. Make a clear to-do list, and make sure you feel the responsibility to finish your to-dos!

The third tip of the day is expectation management. Although I’m not a great player in this field, it’s wise to set some expectations with your manager. Make sure you’re on the same page to avoid any conflicts.

Tip four is again a trait that NGRANE has that I really appreciate: access to HubSpot. Because NGRANE walks the path of inbound marketing, HubSpot is a tool they use daily. HubSpot also has an academy, where you can learn everything about inbound marketing, but also about your own area of expertise.

My fifth tip: chatting. This might sound like a ‘duhhh’ tip, but in times of communication through screens, it’s not too natural to chat. If your company uses Slack, or any other chatting tool: USE IT. Don’t be afraid to ask your colleagues anything, that’s how it would happen in an office. It might feel strange and a step too far, but it actually really isn’t that strange and it will help you a long way in getting to know your teammates!

Last but not least: make sure you don’t put too much pressure on yourself. As the philosophy of NGRANE states that we work better when we’re feeling good and able:

In this fast-paced world, we sometimes forget to be human. We forget the importance of human connection. No matter what the pace, no matter how big or small the screen, no matter the actual physical distance, we keep things human.


What I learnt from remote working abroad for a week

Remote working abroad… waking up with the beach stretched out in front of you, meeting and mingling with other creatives and blending work with a love for travel. Yep, that’s pretty much the crowning glory of freelance life. Because, what is more flexible thanto pack up your bags and say “Later peeps, I’m working in Bali for a month.

After travelling around Sri Lanka, I spent one week of remote working to test the tropical waters for myself. Here’s my experience and a few tips on how to make it the best experience for yourself.

What is remote working?

First things first, what is remote work? Remote working basically means a “new” type of work that goes beyond the traditional walls of office space. It means working from anywhere and still keeping that hustle going. This way of working is not necessarily reserved for only freelancers or entrepreneurs. Nowadays, employees often get a day to work at home or elsewhere. It can be a day or a month or it can be your entire year but it can also be a workcation, aka. where holiday meets work. 

Vacation Mode vs. Work Mode

It sounds pretty dreamy, working from a topical place or a new city but don’t forget that it’s also a challenge. Staying disciplined and actually getting work done won’t just magically happen without a lot of effort and self-discipline. We’re wired in a way that being in a tropical setting or even just a brand new city means one thing and one thing only: Vacaaaay. So when all of a sudden you realise “wait a sec I was supposed to be doing work,” it just goes against every fibre of your body to start working.

Look, I love the beach. So working behind my laptop with an ocean view feels like the holy grail of office goals. But turns out, the waves calling my name wasn’t great for concentration. Luckily as a freelancer, I go through all the ups and downs of self-discipline. It’s something I know how to overcome. If didn’t have this experience, I probably would have been floating in the sea all day. By challenging yourself abroad you’re also practising for back home. This will be useful to create more discipline in your day-to-day work schedule.

I’d say to give yourself some time to get into the rhythm – don’t go straight into an intense work mode immediately – give it time, get used to the place. After just two days of working I figured out I don’t function at all with the heat around noon, so I worked in the early morning hours, went to yoga, chilled at the beach and worked after lunch time when it cooled down. If you have a short time like me, it’s a little trickier to find out what works best for you, but the important thing is to keep trying different things or different spots to work at even in a co-working space. After 3 days I knew exactly what time I was most productive, where my favourite spot to work was at what time of the day and when.

Digital Nomad Office Goals

An ideal workspace or homespun office really depends on the person. You have the freedom to design your own remote working holiday. Whatever it is you need to stay motivated and inspired, it’s up to you to make that happen. The internet is overflowing with information so it’s easy to do lots of research before you leave. 

If you’re up for a remote working abroad, you don’t have to fly halfway across the world. For the Europeans reading this, there are places like Porto or Barcelona with great co-working/living places to check out. Or if you want to travel a bit further and prefer the hustle of a big city rather than relaxed beach vibes, head out to New York or Medellin. The point is to get out of your comfort zone, discover a new place, find new inspiration and just enjoy the freedom you have to work from anywhere you want. If you can escape the 9 to 5 office routine, why not?

When you’ve chosen the country or countries you’d like to go to, the next choice to make is where you’d like to work and live from. The options for a digital nomad abroad are endless. You can find co-working spaces that are also co-living spaces like Verse or Hubud. At these places, your holiday becomes a home, which becomes an office – and that is an experience in itself. You can also choose to book yourself into an Airbnb, hotel or guest house near a good co-working space. This way, you can enjoy the benefits of a co-working space and take a step back from the hustle somewhere else. 

Co-working spaces take away all the hassle of a remote working trip. Here you’re guaranteed good wifi,  desks or comfy chairs to work from, other digital nomads and good coffee. But these millennial hubs aren’t your only option. A charming Airbnb or hotel room with good wifi, a desk and anything else you’ll need to get work done will also do. Having a place catered to your needs as a remote worker is great and meeting new like-minded people even better. But a little peace and quiet at your own home-away-from-home can do wonders for your work as well.

Remember, it's still a holiday (sort of)

The point is not to drench yourself in guilt every time you relax a little. Don’t forget the vacation part of workcation. Free time is not only beneficial for your work progress, but it’s also necessary. Both your wellbeing and work will be better off. I did heaps of reading, journaling, yoga and just lying on the beach doing absolutely nothing. I’d suggest to really find something else you can do when you’re there. You could learn how to surf, go to cooking classes or just schedule in some time to explore the city and local food.

Moments like having dinner at a local place or just relaxing, often make room for great ideas. As a copywriter, sentences or phrases for clients will come up when the pressure dials down. Just make sure you have notebook handy and go out and chill. We don’t get enough chances to really be by ourselves and relax back home. So grab the chance when you can. 

If you’re a freelancer, entrepreneur or if your employer gives you the opportunity to work elsewhere, I don’t see any reason why not to try out some remote working. Have a little googling around, ask your community and figure out what you need to get lots of work done abroad. Remember, you decide the terms of your remote working trip. That’s the best part.

I’ve added a few of the best co-working and co-living spaces for you to check out yourself:

https://nomad.life/

https://www.swissescape.co/

https://restation.co/

https://hubud.org/

You can also check out https://nomadlist.com/. Pieter Levels, an Amsterdam Entrepreneur, has set up a list of the best cities to live and work remotely in. It scores cities on things like internet, safety and fun.

For freelancing pros and cons check out Toptal’s ultimate freelancing guide
Read more: Ultimate Freelancing Guide


We read 'Crucial Conversations' and this is what we learned

We read 'Crucial Conversations' and this is what we learned

Many defining moments in life are shaped by the way we engage in important conversations. Whether it’s personal or work-related, when it comes down to a tough conversation that needs to be had – the kind where emotions run high and opinions greatly vary – listening and speaking up at the right time can be crucial. And much like art, having a proper and meaningful dialogue takes practice.

As a team, we recently read Crucial Conversations – a book that offers insights and tools needed for talking when the stakes are high. It sure stirred up some interesting discussions within the team. Here are five takeaways we want to share.

Safety First

When stakes are high, opinions vary, and emotions run strong, it’s important that everyone involved feels safe. If people feel safe, they will open up and talk freely. If they don’t, you know you’re in a crucial situation and will need to change your approach to get out of it. That means learning to look within, since you’re the only one you can control in a dialogue, but also looking for signs of fear with the other. If people start to fight or flight, by forcing their views, staying silent or by changing the topic, you know you need to bring the conversation back to safety.

Change your story

People create their own stories behind an event or experience and because they don’t talk about it, they tend to react based on (their story or) their version of things. It’s always easier to turn others into villains when they say or do something you don’t like. Most of the time it’s not their intent to make you feel bad. When you react and treat your conversational partner like they have done bad by you, you’re most likely to get even further away from your initial goal. Change the story you tell yourself and take charge of your emotions, so your feelings won’t drive your actions during a conversation.

Facts, facts, facts

What really struck with us and helped us a lot is quite simple but often overlooked: to always mention the facts. Facts are the most persuasive argument but often it’s clouded by emotions. Take the time to straighten out the facts and keep the dialogue on track. That way a calm and collected crucial conversation is ensured.

Sarcasm much?

Another interesting insight was use of sarcasm, something we are definitely not unfamiliar with. Though often meant as wit, sarcasm is basically criticism disguised as humor. It made a lot of sense to us once we understood how sarcasm is a type of masking, which is when we understate or selectively show our true opinions. Being more aware of this now we often see how people are not communicating effectively, because they are not in dialogue. So, tone down the sarcasm and focus on creating an environment where everyone feels safe to speak. Creating awareness around the use and effects of sarcasm, among other things, was a great first step for us to take.

Learn to look and stay curious

When talking about the book, its contents and the several examples given, we realized how much crucial conversations are the solid foundation of our lives, work and relationships and even affect our health and how we feel. We encounter crucial interactions every day so effective communication during those moments cannot be overlooked. There’s not one big lesson to take from this book, since your personal style of communication has a lot to do with what you have to work on to communicate efficiently. Nevertheless, it’s safe to say that learning to look at what happens around you and staying curious towards others helps to establish a safe environment for people to talk. Not an easy skill to master, but one that can make a big difference in so many areas in work and life if you ask us.


Three inspiring takeaways from The Next Web

Photo credit: Dan Taylor

Every year, tech-enthusiasts flock to Amsterdam for one of the most popular conferences in the industry: The Next Web. We of course, couldn’t miss this either and quickly got our tickets to join in on the fun. It was three days jam-packed with inspiring talks, heaps of mingling fun and we even got to meet our heroes. Jongky, David and Jeffrey share what inspired them from their favourite talk.

Besides going for our yearly inspirational fix, we had a story to tell ourselves as well. We’ve created ForteFor, a platform for freelancers to find projects they’ll love. Geared up in logo tees, we connected with other freelancers at the conference and pitched our idea to pretty much anyone we could find.

Want to know more about Fortefor? Check out the website.

Jason Silva – Futurist & Filmmaker

(yes, also that guy from Brain Games)

“Forget robots, in the future, we could become technology”

Technology is rapidly changing, opening possibilities of the future. Humans are linear thinkers while technology is exponential, to stretch our imagination of the future we need to align our mindset to technology. We need to become exponential thinkers and technology will help us transcend our biological nature. We are becoming programmable, we are code (DNA) and have authorship over our owns species. As Jason puts it, “the future of us is ours to dream.”

Rich Pierson – Co-founder & CEO Headspace

“Take care of your Mind”

As a day to day struggle, the mind is mostly at the top of our list. Headspace’s goal is to prevent this, with meditation made simple. Increasing (com)passion while decreasing aggression with a free mindfulness app and a few minutes of your day. As long as you’re present in the moment, meditation is a skill to become mindful and the same goes for activities such as running. The presentation was full of insights and tips but we particularly like this one: don’t get rid of the things that you don’t like, get closer and form a different relationship to it.

Susan Lindner – Founder & CEO, Emerging Media

“Inspire employees with a higher purpose”

In our modern world, disengagement is often hard to avoid. Leaders can retain top talents by connecting them to a higher purpose that goes beyond the 9-5 framework. Engaging them with an authentic story that they can get behind and become ambassadors of. Patagonia is a fantastic example, giving employees the opportunity to support environmental work. Cisco gave employees a voice by letting them takeover of the brand’s own snapchat account, within 6 months there was a 400% increase in snapchat followers.


Our favourite WeWork spots

Photo credit: Angela Tellier

We work, we hustle and we make great things happen – but sometimes we simply lose a little bit of our concentration. Thoughts drift off into dinner options (order thai or make your go-to pasta?), we’re talking more to our neighbours than typing that important email or we can’t stop checking the latest Instagram stories. When this happens, there’s only one thing left to do. Switch things up.
Luckily, we’re in the stylish haven of WeWork, which lets us bring new life into our workflow, without even leaving the building. Here are a few of our favourite spots.

Stephen - Fifth Floor Cocoon Chairs

My all-time favourite spot is in the kitchen area on the 5th, by the window in one of the big green chairs. It’s nice and quiet most of the time, the chairs are extremely comfortable and they feel like a cocoon which is perfect for creating a little “private” area. The chair can also turn so you can glide out of the “private” zone to the kitchen area and catch up with colleagues!

Emily - The Wellness Room

“I wanted a dedicated room for meditation for a long time here at WeWork.”

The community manager Janine and I started talking about it about a year ago and I helped out with brainstorming on the concept for the room a bit. To actually see the end result now is just great. Here hard-working professionals get a chance to unwind and recalibrate. Meditation and Yoga help you clear your head and remember where you left your inner peace. The more you remember where you parked that inner peace, which is a direct result of meditating, the more resilient and energetic you become. Guess who’s better equipped to take on their stressful projects now?

One day being able to close your eyes and reconnect with your inner peace will be as accepted as deserving to have a healthy lunch is nowadays. Whenever you are ready, come give it a try!

Wing - First Floor High Desks

I love working on the first floor, by the large windows overlooking the hallway entrance. It checks all the right boxes to get me into concentration, but most importantly the high desks let me work standing – which key to switching things up during the day. It’s usually very quiet and calm over there. And as a bonus; it’s also one of the only places in the building that doesn’t have music playing.

Nikos - Ground Floor Secret Staircase

My favourite spot in WeWork would have to be the staircase area on ground floor. I love this spot as it gives me the opportunity to work standing up to get into a different mode than you’re sitting. It also has an amazing view of the canals and lovely typical Amsterdam buildings, for a nice dose of inspiration!


Is Freelancing for me

Yep, we know, freelancing ain’t always a breeze and perhaps the hardest part is taking the leap. When you ask yourself the question; is this for me? There is only one answer: yes. Just considering all the unique personalities at Ngrane, there is not one perfect mold each of us fit into. Some of us are assertive while others prefer laying low. We’ve got natural Zen masters and all-over-the place types. Some of us are early-bird’s other prefer 9pm beginnings. You get the point.

All that aside, each of us make it work, in our own way. That’s the real magic of freelancing, you define how you get to work so inherently it’s for anyone. Nonetheless there are a few things each of us comes across in our freelance ventures and certain things we all benefit from.

“Yes, I’d like to carve my own path.”

Most career paths are a singular road with one final destination. A freelance path however is one you carve yourself, one that meanders around, crisscrosses and has more than just one finish line. It’s a real head-on way of getting to know your craft. Instead of working for one company and learning from their singular way of doing things, you’re switching companies on a weekly basis and getting to know different approaches. Besides that, creative solutions are mostly up to you and what better way to learn that when you’ve solved something yourself? You’ll be finding your own sources and a network to help you out in no time

Take Jeffrey Goodett, our visual designer, he wanted to extend his graphic design skills into animation, finding a more specific niche within his trade. “I spent my extra time on learning from different online tutorials, found other animators to help explain things to me and just kept practicing and practicing. Slowly I took on animating projects and if I say so myself, i’ve gotten seriously good!”

“Yes, send over those epiphanies.”

Bumping into daily epiphanies, whether grand or small, is not unlikely in a freelancer’s life. When you’re working with and for different people, while doing a myriad of things, you’ll start to figure out your own skill set. Freelancing is the best way to learn what you’re capable of. To surprise yourself. To bring newfound skills to light. Moreover, it’s a brilliant way of finding your own rhythm. For example, you learn how or when you’re most productive or find your own unique ways of managing projects.

Freelancing is more than ‘Do What You Love’, but also about finding out what exactly that is. In each of our trades there’s many different things we can be doing, what is it you want to find your niche in? That is something you actually have the room to explore.

“Yes, I’m all for meeting new people.”

Freelancing is seen as a lonely endeavor. Sitting behind your laptop in the nearest café or typing away in yesterday’s gym clothes. The truth is, that’s just not the case. Working with different clients means meeting new people, much more than when you’re stuck to one job or one department. It also somewhat forces you to network and although it has a selfish un-personal reputation, it can actually be very social. Freelancers get to benefit from all the charms of co-working spaces like WeWork (represent!) and leave it up to a product of millennial culture to be a real hub for friendships – after-work karaoke anyone?

“Yes, freedom & independence is my jam.”

Wake up at 12pm? Go for yoga after lunch? Go to Bali for three weeks and work remotely? Sounds like a dream, right? Nope, that is just the reality of freelance life. Sure, we have clients that expect certain things, scary deadlines or certain days we have at clients’ offices. But in general freelancing means we get to make our own decisions and to create the way of life we personally desire. Wearing your comfy pants at home isn’t so bad either.

Jefferson tell us his experience, “For me it’s the freedom and independence I get as freelancer. I like the ability to work from anywhere in the world. I definitely took advantage of that this year by working briefly in Malaga, Berlin and Curaçao. Believe me, it’s not always a bed of roses, but if you organize your time and projects well it can be pretty satisfying.”

So, still not sure if this is for you? At Ngrane we’re real freelance enthusiasts, but we’re also just very honest. So, don’t be afraid to give us a call or come by and we’d love to chat!

Call Jongky – he’s the most talkative of us.

+31 6 1422 2952